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HANGING OUT Youth Culture Then and Now

posted by the hanging out team - Sunday, November 19, 2017

 “HANGING OUT”, a 55-minute documentary about diversity in youth culture in London in the 1950s, 1960s and today. Directed by Lorna Holder & Yvonne Deutschman and produced by Tuareg Productions Ltd. 

“HANGING OUT” features a multi-cultural view on how youth culture has manifested itself in the London boroughs of Lambeth, Brent, Camden & the City of London during the 1950s, 1960s and now.  Both native Londoners and ethnic minorities share their memories and experiences of growing up over this time. They talk about music, fashion, film, sport and entertainment richly illustrated with archive film, photographs and iconic posters.

From 'flower power” fashion to designer brand obsession, from telephone box to mobile phone, from cafe & club culture to social online networking. Mods & Rockers at the Ace Cafe reveal how the press used to pay them a fiver to fight each other on the beaches of Brighton.  Young people today express their fears of crossing borders in London and how they can afford expensive designer brands.

One thing that hasn't changed is the passionate energy young people past and present bring to anti-war or university fees protests.  It also becomes clear that the older ethnic generation were quite stuck in their enclaves whereas today young people interact with ease with each other across the racial & religious divide. Music and clubs played a vital part in bringing black & white young people together.

Highlights include former MP Tony Benn, Mike Bieber (CND) and Kurt Barling (BBC correspondent) exchanging views on protests; early 1960s archive clips of Malcolm X address to the Oxford Union and Millie Small singing “My Boy Lollipop” on Top of the Pops. Freddie Notes and the Rudies, the first British ska/reggae band in Britain, tell the story of Muhammad Ali's first visit to Brixton and we hear the story of Michael Jackson buying a safari hat “off the wall” at Laurence Corner, the iconic military clothes shop in Camden, that inspired his album “Off the Wall”.

Hope you enjoy viewing this fascinating and original documentary View Hanging Out trailer:  http://www.hangingout.org.uk/film_project.htm

Meditations beneath Duppycherry Tree

posted by the hanging out team - Tuesday, November 14, 2017

"Meditations beneath Duppycherry Tree" by Fowokan George Kelly

Jamaican Business Language and Marketing Evening Showcase

posted by the hanging out team - Saturday, May 10, 2014

There was no better way to start the Jamaican Business Language and Marketing Event than with an inspirational videography showcasing Jamaican culture and history and its influence across time. This motivating journey continued with three key Jamaican business leaders sharing their professional and entrepreneurial experience of starting and cultivating a winning business product in the UK.



12 Years a Slave – A Missed Opportunity?

posted by the hanging out team - Sunday, January 26, 2014

12 Years a Slave is adapted by screenwriter and novelist John Ridley and directed by Steve McQueen from a memoir written 150 years ago, by Solomon Northup.  It tells the true story of a black man born free in New York State, tricked, drugged and snatched off the streets of Washington and sold into slavery in the South.

There are great performances from all cast members with, Chiwetel Ejiofor holding on to the dignity of Northup, making the audience question what you would do if your freedom and power were taken away over night. Lupita Nyong'o makes a stunning debut as Patsey, a field slave who was born into slavery.

McQueen effortlessly draws you along the journey of the film with strong powerful visuals that tackle and immerse you into the ugly realities of slavery head on.

We get a well composed continued shot of Solomon's wondering face full of hope, fear and loss after a conversation with a sympathetic carpenter Bass, played by Brad Pitt, then his view falls onto the audience, engaging you into this moment of reflection on the journey he’s been through.

We also see Northup become the victim of an attempted lynching by his overseer, as he dangles from a tree by his neck, his toes scrabbling on the ground desperately trying to keep him self from dying. McQueen shoots this scene as a punishing long take from a distance. It’s length and intensity impresses on the audience a feeling of crisis.

The film has a very swift end, that feels rushed and I was left wanting more of Solomon Northup’s journey as a free man in New York. What was everyday life like for black people during that time in the free North? An opportunity was missed here to delve deeper into this story, as I think only then would the audience have truly been able to feel the real contrast between having freedom in one moment and then losing it all in the next.

You can watch 12 Years a Slave until the 30th January at the Rich Mix in Bethnal Green.

Elam Forrester, Hanging Out Project Writer

Departure Lounge

posted by the hanging out team - Monday, November 25, 2013


Departure Lounge written and produced by Lorna Holder, follows the story  of Nena, a woman who is about to return to the Philippines after 25 years working in the UK. As she sits nervously waiting for the boarding announcement she has to make a final decision , should she return to the Philippines to the husband she hardly knows and son whose childhood she missed? Or should she remain with  the adopted English children she has raised?

Man of Steel

posted by the hanging out team - Wednesday, July 10, 2013

I have some fond memories of the 1978 'Superman'. I'll admit it's been a while since I've seen it but I remember it fondly. There was romance, action, a ridiculous plot, and a clumsy Clark Kent who happened to have a secret; he could transform (any shabby phone box will do...) into this meta-man superhero, the shining beacon of the good guy. Sure, the film was of it's time, and I'm sure shows it's age a little now, but crucially, it had charm.I couldn't help but approach 'Man of Steel' with the 1978 film in mind. And that may have been a mistake, since this is a very different beast.

'Man of Steel' is directed by Zack Snyder (300, Watchmen, and (yuch...) Sucker Punch), and kicks us off with overlong prologue-like story where we are force fed the history of a special effect laden Krypton, its destruction and baby Superman's departure to earth. Superman's father (Russell Crowe) does a few heroic turns and the despotic General Zod (Michael Shannon) growls and sneers a lot. When we finally get settled on earth, we watch Clark Kent (Henry Caville) grow until the day when suddenly everyone finds out who he really is. General Zod attacks and complete chaos ensues.

The mayhem caused is staggering. Buildings are demolished, cities crushed, people (who I'm sure must be in the buildings somewhere?!) seem to have no hope at all, while Superman and Zod bounce all over the place. It's noisy, dumb and extremely effects heavy. It's unfortunate, but I just can't imagine anyone looking back on this movie with anything resembling fondness. 'Man of Steel' may get your blood pumping as you see things hurtle through the air, but it lacks romance, and is without any of the wit which made the 1978 Superman (or even the more recent 'The Avengers') so charming.

By Nicholas Beer.

'Man of Steel' is showing at the Rich Mix cinema on Shoreditch High Street.  Clickhere for details.








BFI

posted by the hanging out team - Thursday, April 18, 2013

INVITATION --- FREE PRIVATE SCREENING --- HANGING OUT-THEN AND NOW--- IN HD --- BFI SOUTHBANK 

HANGING OUT - then and now is a 50-minute documentary about youth culture in London during the 1950’s, 60’s and now, directed by Lorna Holder & Yvonne Deutschman and produced by Tuareg Productions Ltd. 

From flower power fashion to designer brand obsession, from telephone box to mobile phone, from café & club culture to social online networking, experience HANGING OUT. Witness how music and the club scenes of the 1960s played a vital part in bringing black and white young people together. Watch the Mods and Rockers reveal how the press paid them a fiver to fight on the beaches of Brighton. Hear about Muhammad Ali’s first visit to Brixton and the story of Michael Jackson buying a safari hat that inspired his album OFF THE WALL. One thing hasn’t changed-is the passionate energy young people bring to anti-war protests and social changes. Highlights include former MP Tony Benn and Kurt Barling (BBC correspondent) in discussion with young people around the issues of protest 

…A fantastic watch especially for young people in sixth form and university …. 
View HANGING OUT trailer: 
http://www.hangingout.org.uk/film_project.htm 
Private Screening: Hanging Out- then and now documentary: 
Date: Wednesday 22 May 
Time: 2.30pm 
Venue: NFT1 
Address: BFI SOUTHBANK, Belvedere Rd, London SE1 8XT 
For bookings: 
T: 020 7692 2711 
E:press@tuaregproductions.com 
W: www.hangingout.org.uk 


The Hanging Out project, by Full Spectrum Productions was funded by The Heritage Fund and in partnership with the British Film Institute, Museum of London, Victoria & Albert Museum and Imperial War Museum.


Robot and Frank

posted by the hanging out team - Monday, March 11, 2013

‘Friendship doesn’t have an off switch’ is the tag line for this surprisingly touching heart warmer. A science-fiction set in the near future, ‘Robot and Frank’ is the story of Frank; an ageing jewel thief who fondly remembers the criminal escapades of his youth, yet often forgets his glasses. Although Frank insists he’s fine, his son and daughter worry as his memory loss gets progressively worse and threatens the oncoming of dementia, so, Frank’s given the latest in tech; a humanoid robot programmed to take care of Frank’s physical and mental wellbeing. At first, the cantankerous Frank is reluctant to take on the robot, though after finding that the robot can be trained for certain special tasks (lock-picking, for example), he grows a lot fonder.

‘Robot and Frank’ is a science fiction, and as in a lot of science fiction movies, the robot hints at developing thoughts and feelings of his own, at one point quoting Descartes’ ‘I think therefore I am’. A robot becoming more human-like is often a source of creepiness and threat (‘Dave, stop. Stop, will you? Stop, Dave. Will you stop Dave?’), but here, the robots independence turns out to be very funny. The dialogue between Frank and his robot is very engaging, and sure to make you smile rather than grimace. 

‘Robot and Frank’ could have easily tipped into over sentimentality, or considering its outlandish premise, outright silliness or unintentional creepiness; but instead, it treads a delicate line never overstepping its mark. It keeps a low-key and grounded tone; a fantasy without too much of the fantastical. Occasionally the film threatens into some farcical and unlikely moments, but the performances of Frank Langella as Frank and Peter Sarsgaard as the dead toned voice of the robot are compelling enough to keep those moments from going over the top, and becoming distracting.

‘Robot and Frank’ is a surprising take on a classic formula, with plenty in it to keep you in your seat. It may not be ground-breaking or truly original, but its hour and a half running time, great performances, and genuinely funny moments serve to make this one worth catching.


Nicolas Beer

‘Robot and Frank’ is showing until the 14th of March at Rich Mix Cinema.

Click here for details.

New Stoker Poster And Video A sneak peek at Park Chan-Wook's latest

posted by the hanging out team - Monday, March 11, 2013

It's no great surprise that Park Chan-Wook has assembled a quality cast for his first English-language effort. The much-praised director of Oldboy and Sympathy For Mr Vengeance is now set to bring us Stoker, a horror / drama that has some serious buzz around it - and not just because of Park's previous work. Now we have a gorgeous new international teaser poster for the film to show you, as well as a video with music from the film and a few fresh clips.(Written by Helen O'Hara)



There is a front-line for selling a movie; an immediate and important method of promotion. Some may even say, the most important method; one which may be crucial to the potential success or failure of a movie. It is the poster. A striking and engaging image can do more for a movie than a popular critic’s review, or a well-known actor’s endorsement.

The images on buses, in trains, on walls, are not only designed to raise awareness, but to intrigue. The best and most iconic posters are simple, recognisable and unique. They clue us in to the content of the movie without overtly stating it, and draw us to find out more. Stoker’s poster is striking and demands attention. See above to find out more about it’s creation. 



Nicolas Beer

Django Unchained

posted by the hanging out team - Thursday, February 07, 2013

 image is copyright of the Weinstein Company

The name Tarantino brings with it some expectation when walking in to a screening of one of his films. Apart from the inevitable controversy, trailers, and interviews (including a particularly toe curling channel 4 one http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GrsJDy8VjZk) announcing its arrival, the very fact that it carries the name Tarantino meant I went into that cinema screening with rather a lot of presumptions; it was going to be violent, bloody, frenetic, and over the top, and, well, I wasn’t wrong.

‘Django Unchained’ is set in 1858 in the America’s Deep South just before the abolition of slavery. It’s a period in American history which seems to be getting some cinematic attention recently (courtesy of Mr Spielberg as well as a certain presidential vampire hunter), but Django is a very different beast from them both. The film follows a former dentist, now bounty hunter, Dr King Schultz, who buys the freedom of the slave Django to help complete a job. Along the way, the narrative turns to revenge as Django, aided by the doctor, enacts his vengeance on those white racists who’ve abused him, his wife, and other slaves in numerous different and brutal ways.

‘Django Unchained’ has its entertaining scenes including a particularly comic one in which the Ku Klux Klan struggle with the shoddily cut eye holes in their home made hoods. There are great performances; a brilliantly vile Leonardo DiCaprio chews up the scenery and sneers as he does so as the slave owner and business man Calvin Candie, and Christoph Waltz does a decent job as Dr. King Schultz. The mix-tape like soundtrack of contemporary pop songs woven in with the period setting works, and there are some tense moments, particularly in a scene round a dinner table, in which Dr Schultz and Django try to dupe the pernicious Mr Candie. The problem is these moments occur within a film which feels completely over-stuffed, and way over-long.

There are exciting, frenetic sequences of hyper, explosive, ‘watered-down-ketchup’ style violence where Django bloodies up his oppressors, but they sit uneasily with another type of violence. Slaves are tied up, whipped, abused, and ripped apart by dogs, and these moments don’t sit well alongside the stylized pulpy violence more familiar to Tarantino. Another irk of ‘Django Unchained’ is its use of racial epithets. The dialogue is peppered with that n-word, and contrary to the director’s claim, it doesn’t seem to me to be there for the purpose of historical accuracy (instead I imagine the gleeful grin on Quentin’s face as he wrote them in, “oh boy, oh boy, this is gonna make ‘em mad!”).

It’s unfortunate, because there is a better film in there somewhere, but ultimately ‘Django Unchained’ is too much; too long, and far too indulgent.

Showing now at Rich Mix cinema, click here for details.

By Nicholas Beer.

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